A Travellerspoint blog

Day 24

Vancouver - Yaletown and Granville Island.

rain 5 °C

Today we braved the drizzly rain and headed to the neighbourhood next door Yaletown. We are staying downtown on Robson Street which is the main shopping street.
Yaletown is south west from where we are based. We have decided to go and explore the public market at Granville Island, so a walk through Yaletown down to catch the False Creek ferry at David Lam Park/ Dock is the plan.

Yaletown can be best described by the following:

  • Full of 20 - 40ish yuppies walking their dogs
  • Gorgeous modern condos with amazing views
  • An urban renewal project successfully executed and
  • Wall to wall bars and restaurants.





While I liked it, it didn't appear to be overly family friendly as we didn't see any. That said, within two blocks I saw two child care centres, so I am definitely not correct in my assumption. While the condo's for the most part are new, some along with the bars and restaurants are old industrial buildings that have been converted. These look great and to lend a lot to the "yuppy" vibe of this precinct. We made our way to the dock and after a wait and three full ferries passing us, we manged to make our way to Granville Island.




The ferry ride itself was very relaxing. It is only about a 5 - 10 minute ride to the Granville Island dock. The Public Market is right next to where we disembarked, so that's where we headed. For the Aussie's reading this, it is very much the same as the Queen Victoria Markets in Melbourne or to you other's, the Farmers Market in Los Angeles.

There was amazing food and produce, flowers and crafts. We looked at everything and were amazed by the freshness and quality. We watched the locals do their shopping and sampled what we could. I was in love. Pat was impressed by the gigantic Canadian apples.











Once we had explored this building, to appease the children we made the 5 minute walk from the public market down to the kids market. Here the children enter via a child sized entrance to a building full of shops catering to the little people in our lives. We enjoyed the strolling amongst the shelves here as much as the boys did.




From here we then did a entire circuit of the island and browsed all the artisan shops. We were amazed by the workshop at Ocean Artworks. We got to see native totem poles in different states of completion. From the bare poles to the almost complete and unpainted totems. Gosh I would love to take one home.






The island is also home to the Emily Carr University. Here you can study design, fine arts and media arts. With all the artisans next door it is a great place to indulge the creative part of your personality. We stopped and watched a lady hand make/sew a straw broom at the Granville Island Broom Company. It takes about 20 minutes to fashion one with a straight dowel handle ($70) and a hour or more with a naturally twisted one ($120+). They are beautiful! Check out the link as I was too shy to ask if I could take photo's.




As soon as the boys got restless we made our way back to the ferry. I had noticed that today, a majority of the ferrymen were young girls. Early 20's in age and very friendly. I found myself quite envious of them. They made it seem like they had the best job in the world. I would have loved to have been a ferry skipper when I was their age.



Canadians are so polite it wears off onto you. I just wish it would be permanent. It took about 25 minutes to get back home, which in the rain was just long enough. Tomorrow the weather forecast is for a fine day. We look to explore Stanley Park, but that may change. So far we are having a great time here in BC.

Posted by petty1912 21:33 Archived in Canada

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